sportingnewsarchive:

HISTORY
Chicago White Sox Ed Walsh’s baseball he used to two-hit victory in 1906 World Series. (Sporting News Archives)

sportingnewsarchive:

HISTORY

Chicago White Sox Ed Walsh’s baseball he used to two-hit victory in 1906 World Series. (Sporting News Archives)

sportingnewsarchive:

SPACE INVADERS

Spacemen “invade” Chicago White Sox and Comiskey Park on May 26, 1959. (Sporting News Archives)

May 9, 1984 - the Chicago White Sox and Milwaukee Brewers completed a 25-inning game, lasted 8 hrs 6 min

athleticpoetics:

image

The longest American League game, and tied for the longest major league game by innings which ended with one team winning, was a 7-6 victory by the Chicago White Sox over the Milwaukee Brewers in 25 innings, at Comiskey Park in Chicago in 1984. The game began at 7:30 p.m. on the evening of May 8, and after scoring early runs both teams scored twice in the 8th inning; but the game was suspended after 17 innings with the score tied 3-3 due to a league rule prohibiting an inning from beginning after 12:59 a.m.

The game was continued the following evening, May 9, and both teams scored three times in the 21st inning to make the score 6-6; finally, in the bottom of the 25th, the White Sox’ Harold Baines hit a home run to end the contest. Tom Seaver was the winning pitcher in relief. (a regularly scheduled game followed, meaning both nights saw 17 innings played; Seaver also started, and won, the second game). The official time of the entire 25-inning game was 8 hours 6 minutes, also a major league record.

samarov:


1904 Chicago White Sox, leaving for spring training, players gathered on railroad platform, train conductor stepping forward…

samarov:

1904 Chicago White Sox, leaving for spring training, players gathered on railroad platform, train conductor stepping forward…

The 1959 coaching staff. From left to right: Ray Berres, Tony Cuccinello, Al Lopez, Don Gutteridge, John Cooney

The 1959 coaching staff. From left to right: Ray Berres, Tony Cuccinello, Al Lopez, Don Gutteridge, John Cooney

(Source: instagram.com)





Luis Aparicio shakes hands with JFK

Luis Aparicio shakes hands with JFK

savage-america:

Chicago White Sox wordmark, 1976-81

savage-america:

Chicago White Sox wordmark, 1976-81


The official suspension letter sent to seven members of the White Sox who threw the 1919 World Series.

The official suspension letter sent to seven members of the White Sox who threw the 1919 World Series.

therealbsmile:

1935 Chicago White Sox Team This was quite a squad, filled with some real characters…not the least of which was future Hall Of Fame Umpire Jocko Conlan (front row, left). Here’s a great story about how Jocko got started as an umpire from the July 3, 1967 issue of Sports Illustrated: From Spikes To A Blue Suit: “I never wanted to be an umpire in the first place. When I was a ballplayer the thought never entered my mind. I wanted to play ball and then I wanted to become a manager. But in 1935, when I was with the Chicago White Sox, I was fooling around with Ted Lyons in the dressing room one day and I broke my thumb. I didn’t bother to tell Jimmie Dykes, who was the White Sox manager then. I was getting toward the end of my career, and I hadn’t been playing much anyway…”

therealbsmile:

1935 Chicago White Sox Team
This was quite a squad, filled with some real characters…not the least of which was future Hall Of Fame Umpire Jocko Conlan (front row, left). Here’s a great story about how Jocko got started as an umpire from the July 3, 1967 issue of Sports Illustrated: From Spikes To A Blue Suit: “I never wanted to be an umpire in the first place. When I was a ballplayer the thought never entered my mind. I wanted to play ball and then I wanted to become a manager. But in 1935, when I was with the Chicago White Sox, I was fooling around with Ted Lyons in the dressing room one day and I broke my thumb. I didn’t bother to tell Jimmie Dykes, who was the White Sox manager then. I was getting toward the end of my career, and I hadn’t been playing much anyway…”

homage:

On August 21st 1926, Chicago White Sox pitcher Ted Lyons no-hit the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park. Lyons’ no-hitter, which took just 67 minutes, was the eighth in franchise history, and only the second on the road.

homage:

On August 21st 1926, Chicago White Sox pitcher Ted Lyons no-hit the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park. Lyons’ no-hitter, which took just 67 minutes, was the eighth in franchise history, and only the second on the road.